CUTE telemetry beacon description

In preparation for the CUTE cubesat launch on September 16, 2021, I’d like to get the CUTE beacon packet contents published prior to launch.

CUTE_beacon_definition

Karen Bryant
University of Colorado

CUTE is a 6U CubeSat whose bus and primary subsystems (including the attitude control system, GPS receiver, communication systems, electrical power system, and solar array) are provided by Blue Canyon Technologies.
CUTE will have a 1-year mission life time and will launch in 2020 and use near-ultraviolet (NUV) transmission spectroscopy from 255 to 330 nanometers (nm) to characterize the composition and mass-loss rates of exoplanet atmospheres. CUTE measures how the NUV light from the host star is changed as the exoplanet transits in front of the star and passes through the planet’s atmospheres. CUTE’s spectrally resolved lightcurve will provide constraints on the composition and escape rates of these atmospheres, and may provide the first concrete evidence for magnetic fields on extrasolar planets.
The keys to unlocking the diagnostic potential of these systems are spectral coverage in the appropriate bandpass and the ability to follow the systems for several orbital periods. CUTE is designed to provide exactly that – low resolution spectroscopy of critical atmospheric tracers (Fe II, Mg II, Mg I, OH) that are inaccessible from the ground, and a dedicated mission architecture that enables the survey required to characterize atmospheric structure and variability on these worlds.
CUTE was constructed at the University of Colorado, Boulder and the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP).

https://lasp.colorado.edu/home/cute/what-is-a-cubesat/

LEDSAT active

1k2 GMSK beacons received, now switched to 9k6
all packet uploaded to SatNOGS

1: [1KUNS-PF] [10:42:46R]
[priority:2 src:1 src_port:59 dest:9 dest_port:8 len:144 FEC_err:0 RS_err:2]
82 92 3B 00 16 2A 01 5B 59 68 77 F6 F3 AC 0C 8E 0C 9D 0C A0 02 07 00 A2 00 0D 08 04 00 01 00 01 00 01 00 01 00 00 00 00 00 ED 00 6A 20 73 00 00 01 AF 00 0A 00 00 04 4B 00 00 00 00 FF 8B 03 62 00 0F 00 11 FC 2B 03 63 FE 42 10 FA F9 D8 00 A6 01 5E 03 9D 00 4B FD C1 FF E7 05 46 00 45 00 39 02 18 00 D6 00 45 00 34 08 00 27 A2 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 04 02 95 C8 F8 A4 25 DF CB B4 84 CA BE 49 A8

1: [1KUNS-PF] [10:43:01R]
[priority:2 src:1 src_port:26 dest:9 dest_port:8 len:144 FEC_err:0 RS_err:0]
82 92 1A 00 16 2A 01 5B 59 68 78 05 F3 A8 09 2D 09 83 08 44 00 76 02 34 00 4B 08 03 00 01 00 01 00 01 00 01 00 00 00 00 00 BC 00 6A 20 69 00 00 01 AF 00 0C 00 00 04 4C 00 00 00 00 FF 8A 03 62 00 10 00 13 FC 0D 03 3F FE 6B 08 83 E8 AA E9 2A 01 2C 03 6B 00 AF FD DA FF E7 05 91 00 58 02 38 00 16 00 3D 00 66 00 58 08 00 27 A2 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 04 24 B5 E8 68 C6 45 7F 31 A3 DA A2 2D 49 A8

ISS SSTV experiment

Friday and Saturday August 6 – 7, 2021, Russian cosmonauts onboard the International Space Station will transmit SSTV images from the station on 145.800 MHz FM. They will use SSTV mode PD-120.
The transmissions are part of the Moscow Aviation Institute SSTV experiment (MAI-75) and will be sent via RS0ISS, the ham station in the Russian Zvezda (Service) module using a Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver.

The announced schedule is August 6, 10:50 UTC – 19:10 UTC and August 7, 09:50 UTC – 15:55 UTC. Dates and times are subject to change.

IT-SPINS

On June 29th at 22:50 UTC a scientific nanosatellite* (a 3U CubeSat) sponsored by the American National Science Foundation will be deployed into its operational orbit and begin transmitting. We are looking to the Amateur Satellite community to track the satellite and record its beacon signals and be the first to confirm operations and report in.

The details:
Timing: The satellite activates itself and begins beaconing 60-minutes after its 22:50 UTC 6/26/21 deployment.
Beacon cadence: every 30-seconds
Beacon downlink frequency: 437.405 MHz
Modulation: GMSK
Telemetry Rate: 19200 baud
Transmitter output power: 1 Watt
Antenna gain 2.15 dBi
Altitude: 490 km circular
Inclination: 51.6 degrees

Pre-deployment predicted Two line elements (TLEs):

1 99999U 21180.95138889 .00000000 00000-0 00000-0 0 00001
2 99999 051.6425 279.6175 0007789 261.9289 239.7719 15.23772142000052

(Post-deployment TLEs will be posted at
http://www.ssel.montana.edu/itspins.html
as soon as available after deployment.)

Send tracking reports to: klumpar@montana.edu

*The satellite is known as the Ionosphere-Thermosphere Scanning Photometer for Ion Neutral Studies (IT-SPINS, for short). Built by Montana State University in Bozeman Montana (USA) and by SRI International in Menlo Park CA, and by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the satellite will make scientific observations of emissions from the nighttime ionosphere to study oxygen ion interactions with the neutral upper atmosphere.